News

New non-native species job

19 September 2017

New non-native species job

Executive Officer - Non-native Species Secretariat - Fixed Term Appointment for 2 years

Job description

The main responsibility of the postholder is to support the normal functioning of the Non-native Species Secretariat in order to release time for others in the team to focus on EU exit. This will include, but not be limited to:

  • Responsible for the general functioning of the NNSS, including organising regular meetings preparing meeting papers, minutes etc.
  • Responsible for updating and maintaining the NNSS website (e.g. adding news, events, gallery images, etc.).
  • Monitoring the public facing NNSS inbox and alert mechanism and responding appropriately.
  • Supporting the GB risk analysis mechanism (e.g. processing risk assessments, identifying experts to conduct risk assessments, supporting risk management initiatives, gathering data to support pathway prioritisation, etc.)
  • Supporting and delivering NNSS communications and training work (e.g. developing ID materials; helping to disseminate Check, Clean, Dry and Be Plant Wise; helping to review communications messages; helping to encourage uptake of non-native species training by stakeholders).
  • Other duties as may be required commensurate with the level of the post

For more information visit the Civil Service Jobs website 


Global perspectives help scientists to understand why and how invasive species move around the world

15 September 2017

Global perspectives help scientists to understand why and how invasive species move around the world
Scientific links between the UK and China have been strengthened at the University of Southampton during an international workshop supported by the Newton Fund Researcher Links programme of the British Council and the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Researchers at this three-day event at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton examined the global threat of invasive species and discussed ways to detect and prevent them.

Delegates presented evidence on how ships crossing the oceans may inadvertently be carrying many species a long way from their natural habitats. Transported to distant environments, these animals and plants can replace native species in their new surroundings. As most of the world’s major ports are currently in China, this workshop was a timely event to bring together Chinese and UK scientists at the forefront of invasion science research to share their knowledge and discuss future directions for research.

This workshop involved 30 researchers based in the UK and China who are all studying non-indigenous species in their new homes. Research highlighted included many topics such as for example the discovery of hybrid fish in east Africa, new developments in environmental DNA analysis to detect invasive species, the growth of agricultural pests in China or the use of satellite imaging to monitor how non-indigenous species expand.

Dr Marc Rius, Lecturer within Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton, organised the workshop with Professor Aibin Zhan from the Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Marc says: “We need global perspectives to tackle this global problem. Scientists in the UK and China are currently addressing these issues in different ways and it has been very valuable to interact and learn from each other.”

Many of the researchers are employing new genomic techniques to sequence the entire DNA content of invasive species to find out more about them, where they originally came from and which pathways they have followed to reach their new locations. Climate change is also playing a part as many of the newcomers may more easily adapt to changing conditions, including extreme temperatures.

“Learning more about invasive species and how they move around the world is an increasingly important area of research and we hope this will be the first of many such gatherings” adds Marc.

New Marine Pathways newsletter available

17 August 2017

New Marine Pathways newsletter available
The latest edition of the Marine Pathways newsletter is now available. Download it here and find out more about the project here.

List of Invasive Alien Species of Union Concern updated

21 July 2017

List of Invasive Alien Species of Union Concern updated
On 13 July 2017 the European Commission published Commission Implementing Regulation 2017/1263 which will add a further 12 species to the current list of 37 species regulated under the EU Invasive Alien Species Regulation (1143/2014).  Find out more here.

New paper: risk management to prioritise the eradication of new and emerging invasive non-native species

20 June 2017

New paper: risk management to prioritise the eradication of new and emerging invasive non-native species
The team at the Non-native Species Secretariat has led the development of a novel risk management tool to prioritise the eradication of new and emerging invasive species in Britain. Experts from across Britain helped to trial the scheme on 41 species, identifying priorities for eradication of established species with limited distributions and contingency planning for species likely to invade in the future. The Non-native Risk Management scheme (NNRM) is one of the first risk management schemes for invasive species in Europe and provides essential evidence to support prioritisation in GB.

The open access paper is avilable here: Risk management to prioritise the eradication of new and emerging invasive non-native species


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