Staffordshire Wildlife Trust Local Action Groups

The Staffordshire Wildlife Trust coordinates the following groups:

-  The Gayton Brook Catchment Project  

-  Cannock Chase Streams of Life

Training day for volunteers

The Gayton Brook Catchment Project is a partnership between the Environment Agency & Staffordshire Wildlife Trust (SWT) 2010-13 and is supported by Natural England, Harrowby Estates, the CLA, NFU, Staffordshire Rural Hub, two angling clubs and a number of private landowners. It is a catchment based project that involves a range of innovative management techniques including: river rehabilitation, river "braiding", river island creation trials, natural flood management, engineered log jam trials and spate management. Working with landowners and volunteers it is also monitoring the whole catchment for any outbreaks of invasive species.

Main objectives include:

(1) Mapping non-native species throughout this catchment.

(2) Setting up a local group comprising of the key stakeholders to tackle non-native species’ issues.

(3) Investigating water quality and identifying the factors which contribute to poor water quality at times.

(4) Addressing diffuse and point-source pollution issues through landowner liaison, the promotion of agri-environment schemes, and one-off enhancement projects.

(5) Removal of two weirs that currently act as barriers to fish movement.

(6) Protecting the surviving native white-clawed crayfish population through the promotion of biosecurity measures to anglers, visitors, walkers, local residents and landowners. 

Surveying Old Brook

The Cannock Chase Streams of Life Project was set up 2006 and works in partnership with Cannock Chase AONB unit, Staffordshire County Council, Forestry Commission, Hanson, Cemex, Environment Agency and several local community and special interest groups (including Staffordshire Mammal Group, Staffordshire Invertebrate Group and Cannock Chase Youth Rangers). This is a landscape scale project which aims to generate catchment-wide conservation initiatives. One of the main focuses of the project is to protect the native white clawed crayfish while also monitoring the area for any outbreaks of invasive species on the AONB.

Main objectives include:

(1) Mapping non-native species throughout this catchment.

(2) Setting up a local group comprising of the key stakeholders to tackle non-native species’ issues.

(3) Investigating water quality and stream corridor habitat quality and identifying the factors which contribute to poor water quality at times and breaks in habitat connectivity.

(4) Protecting the breeding native white-clawed crayfish populations through the promotion of biosecurity measures to land managers, anglers, visitors, walkers, local residents and landowners.

(5) Undertaking a series of small-medium scale habitat enhancement and creation schemes at appropriate locations. 

Native White-clawed Crayfish (c) Nick Mott Staffs WT


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